Expressions of Interest Open for hosting State-based or National ASfAR conferences

State-based Conference 2019

Expressions of Interest are now open for hosting 2019 State-based Australasian Society for Autism Research Conferences. A maximum of two meetings will be supported in a given year (with up to $2500 in funds provided by ASfAR subject to approval from the Executive Committee). Where there are several EOIs in a given year, priority will be given to: (1) strong institutional support, (2) ability to host a keynote speaker (national or international), and (3) conference facilities.

For further information, please see the EOI Form (click to open). EOIs are due September 16, 2019. 

National Conference 2020

Expressions of Interest are now open for the 2020 Biennial Australasian Society for Autism Research Conference. Where there are several EOIs in a given year, priority will be given to: (1) strong institutional support, (2) ability to host a keynote speaker (national or international), and (3) conference facilities.

For further information, please see the EOI Form (click to open). EOIs are due October 31, 2019. 

Questions

If you have any questions please contact
ASfAR President, Associate Professor Mark Stokes, School of Psychology, Deakin University;
mark.stokes@deakin.edu.au; or
ASfAR Vice President Professor Cheryl Dissanayake,
Olga Tennison Autism Research Centre, La Trobe University;
c.dissanayake@latrobe.edu.au

Read More

VP Cheryl Dessanayake named Western Pacific Regional Lead

ASfAR is pleased to announce that our Vice President Professor Cheryl Dissanayake will be the Regional Lead of the Western Pacific region on a new Global Senior Leaders Committee initiative by INSAR (International Society for Autism Research), which aims to ensure that all regions/ countries in the world are represented in INSAR by a senior autism researcher/ clinician.

Read More

Australasia world leader in autism research

Results show Australasian researchers are delivering results for the autistic community with our research output being much greater than would be expected.  In a recent bibliographic analysis, it was found that two Australiasian sites, Australia and Japan, provide much more research related to autism than would be expected on the basis of their population size.  Australia was 4th in world and Japan was 8th for Autism Research.  For more details, see https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5010546/